Rescue

Woman rescues what she thinks is a fox or pup only he turns out to be endangered species

January 8th, 2020

People around the world dedicate themselves to rescuing hurt, neglected, and abandoned animals. Sometimes, that entails pulling a dog or cat from a hoarder’s home. Other times, it involves finding an animal alongside the road. Regardless, you have to give these individuals a lot of props for what they do.

A woman from a tiny town in Australia had the wildest experience. A small “puppy” appeared out of nowhere in the backyard of Jayne Guiney. When she first saw it, she thought it was either a fox cub or someone’s lost dog. But she was wrong…really wrong.

After hearing a whimpering sound, Jayne immediately went to investigate.

As she made her way to the backyard, that’s when she spotted a tiny animal. There it was, perched on the edge of an almost 10-foot cliff. Worried the puppy might fall and die, she responded quickly. “I made a grab for him as he was falling and he pretty much just cuddled in my arms. I still thought he may have been a fox since his face was pointy, but he was robust like a puppy,” Jayne said.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation Source: Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation

She decided to let the poor thing rest over the weekend.

Jayne felt the little guy needed some downtime before she took him to the veterinarian clinic. After the weekend, she took him in only to discover he wasn’t just any ordinary puppy…he was a dingo cub. Just five-weeks-old, they called him Wandi.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation Source: Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation

It was a miracle this dingo lived.

Due to the scratches that the vet found on the dingo’s back, they strongly believed he’d been snatched by a large bird. But somehow, he wiggled free, landing in Jayne’s backyard. As a wild animal, she couldn’t keep him. So, the veterinarian clinic called the Australian Dingo Foundation. This not-for-profit organization works to conserve and increase the dingo population.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation Source: Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation

Learning how to be a dingo

With Wandi being taken from his mother so young, he had no idea how to be a dingo. So, the sanctuary hooked him up with another dingo roughly the same age. Kevin Newman, one of the organization’s volunteers, described Wandi’s personality. “He was a real character straight away. He was very friendly with people and would sink his sharp little teeth into your arms no matter who you were.”

swiggle1 dot pattern2
Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation Source: Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation

Genetic testing proved Wandi was 100 percent Australian Alpine Dingo

In case you don’t know, this particular species of the dingo is the equivalent to the almighty African lion. That means they’re natural predators. Kevin went on to explain, “They don’t bark, only howl to communicate and have an annual breeding season. Cubs are only born in winter.”

swiggle1 dot pattern2
Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation Source: Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation

Finding this cub was extremely important

As it turns out, the Australian Alpine dingo is endangered. If not preserved, there’s a good chance the species will completely disappear. Finding this little guy is beneficial in two ways. First, Jayne saved his life. Second, experts hope he’ll breed to help increase the population.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation Source: Instagram/Australian Dingo Foundation

Although dingos don’t kill cattle, and usually don’t eat sheep since they can’t process fat, they can destroy agriculture. For that reason, some people trap and even kill them. But, they’re an important part of Australia’s ecosystem. If someone ever comes across a situation like this, they should contact a local sanctuary or rescue group that deals specifically with this amazing animal.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: The Dodo,

Advertisement
Advertisement