Rescue
Tiny puppy ‘frozen’ from neck down makes incredible recovery leaving him nothing like former self
He couldn’t bend his front or back legs.
Cherie Gozon
06.08.22

There are instances when we rescue animals in such bad shape, and we’re often clueless about how to help them.

Unsplash - Evan Clark
Source:
Unsplash - Evan Clark

It is always best to send them to a shelter or clinic to have them checked. Even the experts would be surprised at what they would discover in a rescued animal’s condition, just like how SNIPSA found something rare in a rescued puppy.

A ‘Frozen’ Bosely

SNIPSA, an organization led by a group of volunteer veterinarians, found a litter of puppies and realized one of them had a stiff body that looked like he was frozen. They named this little guy Bosley.

YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter

According to SNIPSA’s Executive Director Shannon Epsy, DVM I, they rarely come across a dog with tetanus because dogs are supposed to be less susceptible to tetanus than horses and even humans.

Tetanus in Dogs

Tetanus is a condition caused by a toxin produced by a bacteria called Clostridium tetani. This affects and can spread throughout the body, especially in the nervous system. Once it spreads, it results in hyperexcitability that would result in muscle spasms. Thus, the body goes rigid or stiff.

YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter

It is uncommon for tetanus to affect cats and dogs. It is also quite challenging to detect if they are infected because it may take a while to manifest any symptoms. Only when they notice their bodies go stiff do veterinarians start to suspect that it is tetanus.

Bosley’s Treatment

Shannon shared that they already gave Bosley some antibiotics to help him with his ailment. However, she said they would be giving him antitoxin shots for horses to fight off tetanus; this shot can also be administered to dogs.

YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter

SNIPSA gave updates on Bosley’s case, and his improvements were slow yet promising. On day 2, he could already tuck his hind legs into a sitting position. A couple of days more, and he could already wag his tail. Shannon also said he was more vocal then.

Road to Recovery

Bosley’s road to recovery may be slow, but they took it one day at a time and celebrated each milestone no matter how little. He already showed such promise in his first four days of treatment. It seemed like there was nothing this brave dog couldn’t do.

YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter

Around Day 10, they were slowly weaning him out of being fed in his cage. They already taught him that he had to go out to get his food like the other dogs. At this point, he could already do tiny bicycle kicks in his hind legs.

YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter

They sent Bosley back to his foster home less than a week after. He could already stand on his hind legs, though he still wobbled slightly. But the most fantastic part happened when he was already three weeks since they took him in.

YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Dublin Shelter

Bosley could already do little skips and hops as he learned how to walk! And after another week, he could already run around a play and try to catch up with his sister, Barbie. It was such a joy watching him recover.

But that’s not the happy ending for Bosley just yet. He had something more waiting for him. Last May 1, SNIPSA posted this incredible update on this brave boy. Watch this:

Want to see Bosley’s full story? Watch the video below. And if you want to help other rescues, go to SNIPSA.org and to donate or sponsor a rescue.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By Cherie Gozon
hi@sbly.com
Cherie Gozon is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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