Rescue

Zookeepers Have To Trick Panda Into Taking Care Of Twins

May 21st, 2020

Everyone loves exotic animals, especially exotic baby animals. Some of the cutest exotic animals there are, are pandas, especially giant pandas that are found in China. In this video, we see two adorable twin panda cubs being taken care of by another panda.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Giant pandas are China’s national treasure, and they’re almost extinct!

Pandas are a species of bears that have a distinctive black and white coat, and they live in temperate forests high on the mountains in China because that’s where most bamboo is, which is their primary source of sustenance.

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Giant pandas must eat around 26 to 84 pounds of bamboo a day, depending on which part of the bamboo they are eating. The average giant panda can grow to weigh about 200 to 300 pounds! Even though they are quite bulky, they can climb trees quite excellently.

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Giant pandas are especially important because they’re an umbrella species, a species that, by protecting, indirectly protects many other species that make up the ecological community of its habitat. There are only around 1,800 left in the wild.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

How do they have one panda mom take care of two cubs?

In the video, we are introduced to Quang Quang and Ling Ling, the twin panda cubs in need of quality time with their foster panda mom. At three months old, they are swapped every five days to get their fair share of quality time. To separate her, they distract her with bamboo, which she can’t resist!

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During this time, the keepers trade out Quang Quang and Ling Ling, without the panda mom even batting an eye. They must do it quickly before the foster panda mom notices because most animals would not take their baby back.

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They take Quang Quang to the nursery and start to bring Ling Ling to the foster panda mom. They do it in the knick of time to make sure the foster panda mom is still distracted by her bamboo.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

This panda is helping the twin panda cubs, that isn’t theirs, is doing more than she knows to help.

Most animals would not take their babies back after the human intervention, especially not some other animals. However, panda foster moms are helping to save the species, and this is a groundbreaking technique.

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Once they replace the panda cub with his twin brother, the mom goes straight to the cub and starts grooming her as if he was her own. She grooms him so gently it’s as if he never went away, and she doesn’t know that he had!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

To see a panda take care of two cubs like her own, it is a fantastic sight to see because it is very unlikely. It’s so heartwarming to see this panda have such a strong bond with the two cubs.

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There are many more adorable animal videos just like this one where it came from.

This video was posted on BBC Earth, a channel that celebrates nature, science, space, and the human race. This channel brings you face to face with the sheer wonder of being apart of this amazing planet we all call home.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

This channel was also created by Sir David Attenborough, who brought us all of the Planet Earth series, and who doesn’t love those. If you want to see more videos about this remarkable planet, definitely check out this incredible channel!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Check out these adorable cubs and their foster mom below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: YouTube, World Wildlife

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