Rescue
Hikers spot tiniest orphaned mountain lion cub lying all alone on path
We hope Rose will recover soon!
Cherie Gozon
04.19.22

Humans and animals need each other.

We co-exist because we both need to take care of each other. The animals around us help eliminate pests and insects in our homes, while pets like cats and dogs serve as service and therapy animals. They work great as stress relievers, too!

But in this world, animals often need us more.

Unsplash - Robin Harvey
Source:
Unsplash - Robin Harvey

We have all the capabilities to take care of nature around us. It is our responsibility to ensure that all living things among us are appropriately nurtured. Sadly, this is not always true, seeing how polluted the Earth is now.

However, stories of rescues give us a bit of hope.

It is common for humans to rescue stray pets like cats and dogs. On the other hand, stories of rescuing wild animals are rare. And this one is worth being told.

A group of hikers was traversing in San Mateo when they spotted a tiny lion cub.

YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition

The hikers immediately decided to save it. They called the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, which responded to their call quickly. Then, they transported the sick cub to the zoo, where there were doctors who could take care of her.

They named the cub Rose and made it their mission to make sure she was okay.

YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition

The doctors found out that she was in bad shape. The poor cub was very dehydrated and was covered in fleas and ticks. On top of that, she had a very low red blood cell count, which was very concerning.

Rose was between four to five months old and hadn’t eaten in weeks.

YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition

She also weighted way below the average weight of lion cubs her age. She was only 8.8 pounds when she should be around 30 pounds. The doctors felt the urgency in helping Rose to make sure she made it.

Oakland Zoo doctors’ efforts didn’t go to waste as Rose’s condition improved right away.

YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition

The doctors aided her by bottle and spoon feeding some formula food. However, they still have to address the pressing concern of her anemia. Rose badly needed a blood transfusion.

Luckily, they found a match among their resident mountain lions.


The blood donor was a lion named Silverado. They performed the blood transfusion as soon as both lions got the clearance. Rose looked a lot better after the transfusion than when she was brought to the zoo.

Oakland Zoo kept Rose in their care because she’s not yet fit to live in the wild.

YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Inside Edition

She missed the first few months of her growth and development, which was supposed to be when a cub learns essential survival skills. Without that kind of preparation, Rose might be more in danger in the wild than in the zoo.

In the meantime, she stays in the zoo in the safe hands of the doctors.

Oakland Zoo also posts updates regarding Rose’s condition. She’s getting stronger and more active each day.

We’re cheering for Rose to make a full recovery!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Cherie Gozon
hi@sbly.com
Cherie Gozon is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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