Aww!
Goose taps on animal hospital’s window and asks to see injured mate
She wanted to make sure he was okay.
Rachel Shapiro
01.14.22

A Canadian goose named Arnold and his mate Amelia have a wonderful life together.

The pair have made a home for themselves in the pond near the Cape Wildlife Center in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The vets at the wildlife center know the pair and are always happy to see them.

Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center
Source:
Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center

Unfortunately, though, one day Arnold was injured while he was swimming, most likely by a snapping turtle or another predator. When the staff at the wildlife center saw that Arnold was in a bad state, they quickly rushed him into surgery.

The vets realized that Arnold had two open fractures on his foot, and they knew they’d have to act fast if they were going to save his foot.

Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center
Source:
Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center

The vets began the surgery. But soon, they were distracted by a tapping sound on the door.

“All of a sudden, we heard this tapping at the clinic door, and we were all pretty shocked when we turned around to see his mate standing there, really agitated and trying to get in,” Zack Mertz, the executive director of the Cape Wildlife Center, said in an interview.

The vets were all surprised to see her. Somehow, she had located Arnold inside the center.

“Not only had they been separated for 12 hours at that point, she knew right where in the facility he was and where she could go to get a good view of what was going on,” Zack said.

Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center
Source:
Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center

Arnold’s mate stood by the door and watched his surgery. She wanted to make sure her soulmate was okay.

The staff moved Arnold closer to the door so she could watch over him. She stayed by the door the whole time Arnold was being treated, watching him. The vets were so touched by their bond.

“When they’re together, you can tell they just calm down, they put each other at ease. I, truthfully, I think she’s going to make his recovery a little easier,” Zack said.

Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center
Source:
Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center

Thankfully, Arnold made a full recovery and was soon back out in the pond. Amelia was so happy to have him back.

“We are not sure what they will do next, but we are so happy that they have the opportunity to do it together,” the Cape Wildlife Center said on Facebook. “Arnold’s foot has healed well and today we got to see him both fly and swim. We are confident that he will have no trouble keeping up with his partner Amelia.

Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center
Source:
Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center

Arnold and Amelia’s bond isn’t unusual in the goose world. Most geese mate for life.

“Most Canada geese pair with a mate at age three, though some begin this process at two years. Pairs usually stay together for life,” the Indiana Fish and Wildlife Department writes in an article about Canadian geese.

This article also discusses Canadian geeses’ nesting habits:

“Canada goose nest site selection can be variable, though the nest is nearly always within 150’ of water… Once nesting has begun, the male and female will both defend the nest. The female lays eggs about every 1.5 days. Once all the eggs are laid, incubation begins. The eggs are incubated for 28 days. The average clutch size is 5 eggs, though 2-12 eggs is possible… All eggs in the nest hatch at the same time. The adults then lead the goslings away from the nest, within 24 hours of hatch.”

Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center
Source:
Facebook/Cape Wildlife Center

Arnold and Amelia have an incredible bond, and it’s so sweet to watch them together. We’re glad they’re back at each other’s side!

Check out a video about Arnold and Amelia below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Rachel Shapiro
hi@sbly.com
Rachel Shapiro is a contributing writing at Shareably. She is based in New York and can be reached at hi@shareably.net.
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